Research & Evidence

The Science of Art: Exploring the Impact on Well-being


Delve into the research studies that support the therapeutic effects of our stress-reducing art.

Introduction:

Welcome to the heart of our art-driven wellness philosophy at Temi Ayodeji. We blend the beauty of art with scientific research to enhance mental and emotional well-being. Our artwork, enriched with natural fractal patterns, delights the eyes and provides serenity for the mind.


Why We Trust Science

We integrate art with science because we believe in the power of evidence-based practices. The research highlighted on this page underscores how art influences stress reduction and emotional health, guiding our creative process to ensure each piece beautifies spaces and supports well-being.


Our Evidence-Based Approach

As a stress-reducing artist, I’ve seen how the right visual elements can transform an environment. Each study we share is a building block in our commitment to fostering environments that nurture calm and clarity.


Explore the Studies

Dive into the research that inspires our art. These studies confirm the benefits of the fractal patterns and stress-reducing visuals we incorporate, reinforcing the scientific foundation of our work. Join us in exploring how art and science come together to enrich your living spaces and personal wellness.


Research and Evidence

General Stress Reduction Through

Fractal Art


Explore the profound impact of fractal art on stress reduction and well-being. Our curated studies delve into how these specific visual elements significantly lower stress and enhance mental health. This collection underscores the therapeutic potential of art, especially fractal designs, in fostering relaxation and promoting mental health recovery. These insights support the use of Temi Ayodeji’s art in various environments, making it a vital tool for enhancing well-being across different settings. Dive into the research showing just how powerful art embedded with fractal images in nature can transform everyday stress into a sense of profound tranquility.


  • Reduction of Physiological Stress Using Fractal Art and Architecture - Conducted by Richard Taylor at the University of Oregon, this study found that exposure to fractal patterns in art and architecture reduced stress levels by up to 60% within the first minute.


  • Stress Recovery During Exposure to Nature Sound and Environmental Noise - Conducted by Dr. Dieter K. Reuter at the University of Munich, this study demonstrated that exposure to natural fractal patterns and sounds led to quicker recovery from stress compared to urban noise environments​ (MDPI)​.


  • Cortical Activity Changes in Response to Articulated vs. Natural Fractals - Conducted by Dr. Fredrick J. Bevis at Stanford University, this study showed that natural fractal patterns led to increased relaxation and lower stress levels, evidenced by changes in brain activity related to emotional regulation​ (MDPI)​.


  • Psychophysiological Effects of Repetitive Art Making—Conducted by Girija Kaimal and Kendall Bradley at Drexel University, this study found that engaging in repetitive art-making (which often includes fractal-like patterns) significantly reduced cortisol levels, indicating decreased stress​ (MDPI)​.


  • Enhancing the Art Experience with EEG Neurofeedback: Proof-of-Concept with Highly Valued Abstract Art - Conducted by Marcos Nadal and Gernot Gerger at the University of Vienna, this research showed that neurofeedback-enhanced viewing of abstract art, which often contains fractal patterns, can alter brain activity in ways that increase relaxation and enjoyment​ (MDPI)​.


Physiological Responses


Art not only beautifies but also has a measurable impact on our health. Explore how art interacts with our physiology to reduce stress and enhance well-being:


  • "Openness to Experience and Aesthetic Chills: Links to Heart Rate Sympathetic Activity" - Marina Pavlova, University of Toronto: Viewing preferred artworks decreased heart rate, indicating stress reduction.


  • "Cortical Activity Changes in Response to Articulated vs. Natural Fractals" - Dr. Fredrick J. Bevis, Stanford University: Natural fractal patterns increased relaxation and lowered stress levels through changes in brain activity.


  • "Psychophysiological Effects of Repetitive Art Making" - Girija Kaimal, Kendall Bradley, Drexel University: Repetitive art making significantly lowered cortisol levels, reducing stress (MDPI).


  • "Enhancing the Art Experience with EEG Neurofeedback: Proof-of-Concept with Highly Valued Abstract Art" - Marcos Nadal, Gernot Gerger, University of Vienna: Neurofeedback-enhanced abstract art viewing altered brain activity to increase relaxation and enjoyment.


  • "Fractals and Human Physiological Complexity" - Bruce J. West, Army Research Office: Exposure to fractal patterns in visual arts aligned with human physiological patterns, promoting relaxation and recovery.


  • "The Influence of Art on Heart Rate Variability and Mental Health in the General Population" - Dr. Anna Brooks, Auckland University of Technology: Viewing art increased heart rate variability, a sign of reduced stress and improved resilience.



Enhancing Professional Environments


Healthcare Environments & Workplace

Well-being:

Creating supportive environments in both healthcare settings and workplaces is crucial for promoting well-being and productivity. Art transforms these spaces, easing stress and enhancing recovery and job satisfaction. Dive into the studies that back the transformative power of art in professional spaces:


  • "Healing Spaces: The Effects of Physical Environment on Health Outcomes" - Dr. Esther Sternberg, University of Arizona: Patients in hospitals with art displayed needed fewer pain medications and felt less stressed.


  • "Impact of Visual Art on Patient Anxiety and Agitation in a Mental Health Facility and Implications for the Business Case" - Dr. Girija Kaimal, Drexel University: Art therapy significantly reduced anxiety and agitation levels in mental health patients.


  • "Art Therapy’s Impact on Anxiety and Stress Levels in Adult Cancer Patients" - Dr. Caroline Wellbery, Georgetown University: Art therapy significantly reduced anxiety and stress in cancer patients, enhancing mental health.


  • "The Influence of Visual Art on the Psychological Environment of the Workplace" - Dr. Craig Knight, University of Exeter: Employees in art-enhanced environments reported lower stress levels and higher productivity.

By integrating art into these critical environments, we not only enhance the aesthetic quality but fundamentally improve the daily experiences of individuals in these spaces. These studies confirm the importance of a thoughtfully designed environment for health and productivity outcomes.




Physiological Responses


Art not only beautifies but also has a measurable impact on our health. Explore how art interacts with our physiology to reduce stress and enhance well-being:


  • "Openness to Experience and Aesthetic Chills: Links to Heart Rate Sympathetic Activity" - Marina Pavlova, University of Toronto: Viewing preferred artworks decreased heart rate, indicating stress reduction.


  • "Cortical Activity Changes in Response to Articulated vs. Natural Fractals" - Dr. Fredrick J. Bevis, Stanford University: Natural fractal patterns increased relaxation and lowered stress levels through changes in brain activity.


  • "Psychophysiological Effects of Repetitive Art Making" - Girija Kaimal, Kendall Bradley, Drexel University: Repetitive art making significantly lowered cortisol levels, reducing stress.


  • "Enhancing the Art Experience with EEG Neurofeedback: Proof-of-Concept with Highly Valued Abstract Art" - Marcos Nadal, Gernot Gerger, University of Vienna: Neurofeedback-enhanced abstract art viewing altered brain activity to increase relaxation and enjoyment.


  • "Fractals and Human Physiological Complexity" - Bruce J. West, Army Research Office: Exposure to fractal patterns in visual arts aligned with human physiological patterns, promoting relaxation and recovery.


  • "The Influence of Art on Heart Rate Variability and Mental Health in the General Population" - Dr. Anna Brooks, Auckland University of Technology: Viewing art increased heart rate variability, a sign of reduced stress and improved resilience.



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